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Windage

Boating  Wind shadow  Winding

WINDAGE: The sum of those parts of a boat other than sails that catch the wind.
WINDEX: Trade name that has passed into general usage.


- Any form of wind resistance.
windfall - An unexpected advantage or acquisition of treasure.
wind jamming - A old-fashioned slang term for sailing by the wind. Wind jammers, sailing ships.

Windage
Windage
Either the wind drag itself, or the extent of the drag-creating parts of a craft which are exposed to the wind, as in, 'She's got a lot of windage', meaning that she has a high superstructure (See also: Top hamper) ...


The amount of a boat, sail or other object that the wind can push on.
Windlass ...

WINDAGE The surface area of the boat that will catch the wind.
WINDLASS A mechanical winding device used to pull up the anchor chain.
WINDWARD Towards the direction of the wind.

. Surface exposed to the wind providing resistance; as in: The crow's nest on that boat creates weight aloft and .
windlass. Winch for the anchor rode; as in: Many modern boats have an electric windlass with a remote control.

Windage: Wind resistance of the boat.
Windbound: A condition wherein the ship is detained in one particular station by contrary winds.

This reduces the on the blade thus reducing the effort expended.
Feathering Prop - A propeller that can have the pitch of its blade changed to reduce drag when not in use.

Every boat has different characteristics as far as windage is concerned. The more the windage the larger ground tackle that is needed. Take down all sails, canvas, auxiliary outboard and any thing else that might cause windage problems.

I did a 50-footer like this once and in a 40-knot blow the owner was afraid to enter the marina because of the from his rig. I don't have solutions to this problem that will work for everyone.

Having no sails up. In heavy weather the windage of the mast and other spars can still be enough to move the boat.
under the lee
On the lee side of an object, protected from the wind.

under bare poles - Having no sails up. In heavy weather the of the mast and other spars can still be enough to move the boat.
under the lee - On the lee side of an object, protected from the wind.

Yachts should carry at least two anchors, the bower and kedge. It is difficult to lay down hard and fast rules on anchor size, as windage varies from boat to boat. Expert advice for your type of craft should always be taken.

...

The halyard may also rise up through the mast to reduce aloft, as in the boat shown in this photo, and exit at a point near the deck. Pulling down on the halyard raises the sail.

Feathering Oars:
The turning of the blade of an oar from the vertical to the horizontal while it is being taken aback for the next stroke. This reduces the windage on the blade thus reducing the effort expended.

Generally less efficient for top performance, but does have less aloft when sail is reduced. JIBHEAD RIG - In a jibhead rig the forestay does not attach to the masthead but at a point lower on the mast where the top of the jib meets the mast.

See also: See also: Boat, Wind, Sailing, Mast, Large

Boating  Wind shadow  Winding

 
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